I Fished 365 Consecutive Days Just to Prove a Point (And I’m Still Married) by Stephen Veals

2018 was a tough year. 

I lost my job of seven years. My father-in-law passed away from a slow and agonizing battle with cancer. My yellow lab of twelve years had to be put down in front of me. My seventeen-year-old, 1994 Toyota pickup from high school finally tapped out (the only vehicle I’d ever owned and I’m thirty-one). And to top it all off, we were still stuck with an administration that couldn’t wait to sell off more and more of our hard-earned public lands to the greedy fossil fuel industry.  There were countless excuses to lose faith and remain depressed. 

To hell with that. 

It was just one of those years where you had to dig deep. As in, really deep. Consoling the love of your life as she watches her father slip away in his sleep wasn’t easy to do. And it sure wasn’t easy on our new marriage flying back and forth to his hospital bed every few weeks for the last two years knowing full well that each goodbye could possibly be our last. With all of these heavy emotions, I knew I would have to fight to keep my chin up and stay positive for my wife, Laura, even when I knew deep down the odds weren’t looking good for a cancer recovery miracle. 

Late in December 2017, on my home waters in Idaho, my angling buddy Fred and I started talking about the inevitable cock-measuring fishing topic of “Total Days on the Water.” This heated phrase was the subject of much debate, since neither of us wanted to admit that ultimately our wives would have the final say in the matter for the upcoming 2018 season.

After a long roll cast to a deep urban pool, Fred predicted that he would be confidently rounding out 2018 with over seventy-five days on the water.  A few river sodas later and we were both silently doing the algebraic calculations in our own heads. Racking our brains on how we’d out-gun the other angler with sneaking out before and after work just to be able to firmly mark a large “F” on our hanging wall calendars, the dark sharpie letter indicating for the history books that the day had indeed been blessed with “Fishing.” 

The snow on the ground didn’t stop the fish in the net. A wild Rainbow from public lands beats any fish from private water. You end up working harder, but the reward is worth it.

The snow on the ground didn’t stop the fish in the net. A wild Rainbow from public lands beats any fish from private water. You end up working harder, but the reward is worth it.

January 2018 came and went with an abounding bundle of cold winter days on the Boise river: filled with frozen guides and waders that stand up on their own, frostbitten and full of crackling wrinkles of snow and icy river water.  Large trout were plentiful and so were my days on the water. I had decided that I was silently out to fish 365 consecutive days, and my best buddy had no idea I was gunning for his record. This was going to be the only way I’d survive 2018. I had to just keep my mind occupied on the positive thoughts of fishing. I needed this.

By late March, the conversations turned to concession speeches from each of my angling pals: “We get it man, you proved your damn point. There’s no way you’re gonna continue like this every single day right?” 

River cleanup day. While fishing one day in February, I started to notice just how much crap was floating in my favorite river, and I finally snapped. It was time to clean out an entire mile of the Boise river. I ended up removing over 100lbs of garbage I encountered along the banks. My challenge quickly grew into more than just personal achievements in fishing.

River cleanup day. While fishing one day in February, I started to notice just how much crap was floating in my favorite river, and I finally snapped. It was time to clean out an entire mile of the Boise river. I ended up removing over 100lbs of garbage I encountered along the banks. My challenge quickly grew into more than just personal achievements in fishing.

Wrong. The gate was open and I was off to the races, already concocting the rules in my head. I would have to fish for a minimum of fifteen minutes per day and it had to be on a body of water with fish in it. Sorry, the neighborhood pool or drought-prone canals wouldn’t count. Furthermore, I would set out to try and teach others about the joys of fly fishing along the way. What good was the challenge without spreading the stoke of fishing?

I recently became a mentor in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program and this was also part of my Trump-era idea to help others along the way. My mentee, Brennan, was eagerly awaiting his time on the water. Little did he know he’d get a lot of chances to work on his casting.

Brennan with his first Bluegill on the fly. City ponds were crucial when it came to teaching fundamentals, while also making sure that fish were still hitting the net—no matter how hard the beginner casts were hitting the water.

Brennan with his first Bluegill on the fly. City ponds were crucial when it came to teaching fundamentals, while also making sure that fish were still hitting the net—no matter how hard the beginner casts were hitting the water.

Rule 406: Never get too high and mighty to fish the local stocked pond. Every now and then a few heavy hitters were dropped in and I’d find myself in a place I never thought I’d be excited to fish: On a bank surrounded by Powerbait-flinging, marshmallow-tossing rednecks going after the supposed “Ten-pounders, buddy!” that had just been planted.

Rule 406: Never get too high and mighty to fish the local stocked pond. Every now and then a few heavy hitters were dropped in and I’d find myself in a place I never thought I’d be excited to fish: On a bank surrounded by Powerbait-flinging, marshmallow-tossing rednecks going after the supposed “Ten-pounders, buddy!” that had just been planted.

Date nights were soon modified. Well…only slightly. What started off as a paddle-boarding date quickly became, “Hey babe, can you troll us over to that tree line real quick? There’s some bass over there by those logs.”

Date nights were soon modified. Well…only slightly. What started off as a paddle-boarding date quickly became, “Hey babe, can you troll us over to that tree line real quick? There’s some bass over there by those logs.”

Obligatory safety meeting before hitting the Green River. The 365 challenge meant that “Bro-Time” was mandatory.

Obligatory safety meeting before hitting the Green River. The 365 challenge meant that “Bro-Time” was mandatory.

In order to achieve this ludicrous goal, I’d have to fish different types of water in drastically different parts of the U.S. You see, I’m a cinematographer, and this means I’m on the road—a lot. With video shoots planned in California, Colorado, and Montana, along with family trips to Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and England, it would mean I’d have to be reading up on a lot of water.  What ensued was pure marital suicide: I’d leave my wife on our comfy couch during a Wednesday Netflix night only to go fish right at 11:40 pm just so I could log a day’s fishing. I’d sweat the short five minute drive down to the water while mentally scolding myself on how reckless I was acting by nearly forgetting to fish that day. 

6am flights to the Golden State meant I was up and pitching streamers at 4:15am that same morning. Oftentimes, I was hailing a Lyft with my suitcase and fly rod side by side on a dark, city park embankment, much to the driver’s surprise and astonishment. Producers and directors I’d work with on-set oftentimes questioned my sanity as I’d leave a shoot right after the obligatory That’s a wrap folks would leave the director’s mouth. Yeah, there’s no time to hang out for après-surf-and-turf with the client while faking menial small talk. I had to be fly fishing, and fast. I’d wade down to the muddy Napa river with Sperry Topsiders and a cheesy polo shirt, ill-prepared for the tidal rise and fall of this brackish, Striper fishery while mud ruined my only pair of business casual jeans for the next day’s shoot at an expensive vineyard.

By May, I had lost a ton of flies along the way. I’d constantly hook myself in the neck pitching big flies in complete darkness. I’d find myself rushing to quickly tie on a crappy knot, thinking no fish would lie in such a dark run after a late client review session, only to have the trout of a lifetime smash the streamer and snap me off cold. 

Dumb move, buddy.

By August, the challenge was forcing me out of my comfort zone—the type of zone where you easily could call out your cast with a Dave Chappelle-era “Kobe!” before watching the indicator bob down, finishing with a confident “Fish on!” as follow-up commentary. I was fishing tougher and tougher water in different and varying conditions: Rain, gale force winds, high-water blow outs, 100+ degree days…it didn’t matter. They all turned into days on the water. 

A flood-stage day on Boulder Creek while sneaking out during a visit to the in-laws’ house in Colorado. I’d take 20 minutes to clear my head and go down to the creek with whichever rain poncho I’d managed to stuff in my suitcase. The stress relief while being on the water was something I really came to cherish.

A flood-stage day on Boulder Creek while sneaking out during a visit to the in-laws’ house in Colorado. I’d take 20 minutes to clear my head and go down to the creek with whichever rain poncho I’d managed to stuff in my suitcase. The stress relief while being on the water was something I really came to cherish.

Eventually, I was targeting species I never thought I’d land. Kokanee salmon, Steelhead, six-foot-long Sturgeon, high mountain Golden trout, hard-fighting Bull trout, and even Perch. The list just kept growing. By fall 2018, I had shattered my personal best Brown trout record at 24.5” on Halloween dressed as a 1920’s butler. Adding insult to injury, my buddy Fred was there to witness the nighttime streamer take and he was noticeably depressed by having missed the chance at the Brown himself. He still took my photo with a half smile and a “Nice job bud.”

I’d never had a shot at a Steelhead before this challenge and I can’t say I would have ventured out on my own to go for it. One of the benefits of the 365 challenge was having ideas pop in my head followed by concrete plans to track down a wish list fish the very next day.

I’d never had a shot at a Steelhead before this challenge and I can’t say I would have ventured out on my own to go for it. One of the benefits of the 365 challenge was having ideas pop in my head followed by concrete plans to track down a wish list fish the very next day.

Fish of 100,000 casts. You hear about these guys all the time, but few of us ever get to experience the rod flex of a dimly-lit, urban monster on the other end. I think my pupils dilated 1000% when I felt the first tug.

Fish of 100,000 casts. You hear about these guys all the time, but few of us ever get to experience the rod flex of a dimly-lit, urban monster on the other end. I think my pupils dilated 1000% when I felt the first tug.

I was able to track down a piece of water with mystical Golden trout, originally hailing from the Eastern Sierras in California. I was absolutely blown away by the sheer beauty and intelligence of this elusive fish. Like most Golden trout anglers will tell you: finding them is hard enough, but getting them to take is even harder.

I was able to track down a piece of water with mystical Golden trout, originally hailing from the Eastern Sierras in California. I was absolutely blown away by the sheer beauty and intelligence of this elusive fish. Like most Golden trout anglers will tell you: finding them is hard enough, but getting them to take is even harder.

6’6”, 100-plus pound Sturgeon caught on a streamer and an 8-weight modified with 80lb Tarpon shock line and monofilament. The local shop guys asked me with a puzzled look, “So, what kind of species are you targeting with this?” It was a great moment to have my Uncle Peter along to land it with me. I couldn’t have done it without him.

6’6”, 100-plus pound Sturgeon caught on a streamer and an 8-weight modified with 80lb Tarpon shock line and monofilament. The local shop guys asked me with a puzzled look, “So, what kind of species are you targeting with this?” It was a great moment to have my Uncle Peter along to land it with me. I couldn’t have done it without him.

My first Bull Trout coming in at a perfect 20”. After years of searching for them, I finally made it happen.

My first Bull Trout coming in at a perfect 20”. After years of searching for them, I finally made it happen.

A land-locked Kokanee Salmon is really fun on a fly rod. Even though this was in Idaho, your mind can’t help but feel transported to Alaska.

A land-locked Kokanee Salmon is really fun on a fly rod. Even though this was in Idaho, your mind can’t help but feel transported to Alaska.

A word on trash fish: They were caught in the pursuit of other species. Nothing pissed me off more than finding out my supposed “Trophy Brown” was just a greasy, 24.5” Pike Minnow, or even worse, a Mountain Sucker. The Squawfish pictured above, fight hard and have all the tricky head shakes of a trout.

A word on trash fish: They were caught in the pursuit of other species. Nothing pissed me off more than finding out my supposed “Trophy Brown” was just a greasy, 24.5” Pike Minnow, or even worse, a Mountain Sucker. The Squawfish pictured above, fight hard and have all the tricky head shakes of a trout.

When in Rome:  Whatever situation I found myself in meant making do with what I had, even while traveling to other cities for video shoots. Many occasions were spent fishing near culverts or manmade structures, and there were times where I was surprised by a sudden nighttime take. The lesson: fish like you mean it and take what you can get. It’ll make you a better angler.

When in Rome: Whatever situation I found myself in meant making do with what I had, even while traveling to other cities for video shoots. Many occasions were spent fishing near culverts or manmade structures, and there were times where I was surprised by a sudden nighttime take. The lesson: fish like you mean it and take what you can get. It’ll make you a better angler.

If I wasn’t fishing in the moment, I was enjoying putting others onto fish. Chris Beaudoin snapped this photo while we floated the South Fork of the Snake searching for hungry Cutthroats.

If I wasn’t fishing in the moment, I was enjoying putting others onto fish. Chris Beaudoin snapped this photo while we floated the South Fork of the Snake searching for hungry Cutthroats.

The truth is, I was becoming a more confident angler. I wasn’t getting better, but I was giving myself more opportunities to fail fast and pick up the pieces by the time the next session on the water would come. With so many chances, I was able to do what most anglers claim they do (but rarely live up to): experimentation. I threw everything in my boxes. When I was out of flies, I’d go to the shop and ask about any other weird patterns I could throw. I wasted every dollar I made on shit flies that had a .00001% chance of working. I didn’t care though. I still made sure that I was pushing the envelope constantly with my days on the water, and it paid handsome dividends.

As the months rolled on, the slabs were stacking up. If I missed a large fish one day, I was right back there the next day trying to bring it in. This Brown couldn’t resist a second attempt.

As the months rolled on, the slabs were stacking up. If I missed a large fish one day, I was right back there the next day trying to bring it in. This Brown couldn’t resist a second attempt.

Right at dark: A fourth-quarter Rainbow looking for a meal, sent right under an over-hanging tree line. I finally had an excuse to work on my night-fishing after years of putting it off.

Right at dark: A fourth-quarter Rainbow looking for a meal, sent right under an over-hanging tree line. I finally had an excuse to work on my night-fishing after years of putting it off.

By the year’s end, my wife’s patience was beginning to wear thin, and understandably so. Comments like, “You’re seriously going fishing right now?” quickly turned to, “God I can’t wait for this challenge to end so I can get my husband back.” These were the comments that threw off my chi the whole next day, resulting in a karma-induced lack of fish after a 14+ hour day on the water. As much as I didn’t want to admit it, I could see that the 365 challenge was wearing on my marriage. It was getting harder and harder to justify getting out on the water.

The same week I lost my job, Fred insisted that I could get a pass for cancelling our first-time trip to Pyramid Lake in Nevada. “It’s cool man, I totally understand. I mean, you just lost your job, bro. Can you really afford the guide fees?” I grumpily told him to just worry about picking me up the next day at 2pm. I informed him that we’d still be keeping our fishing commitment, no matter how much I was hurting financially.

The same week I lost my job, Fred insisted that I could get a pass for cancelling our first-time trip to Pyramid Lake in Nevada. “It’s cool man, I totally understand. I mean, you just lost your job, bro. Can you really afford the guide fees?” I grumpily told him to just worry about picking me up the next day at 2pm. I informed him that we’d still be keeping our fishing commitment, no matter how much I was hurting financially.

By midday, I had forgotten about all of the career woes as Cutty after Cutty found its way into our nets. Pictured above is my angling buddy, Fred Simpson, with a nice spawn-colored trout.

By midday, I had forgotten about all of the career woes as Cutty after Cutty found its way into our nets. Pictured above is my angling buddy, Fred Simpson, with a nice spawn-colored trout.

Of course the responsible thing to do when you lose your job is to double-down at the blackjack table. This time, Reno was kind to us after an insane day of fishing on Pyramid Lake.

Of course the responsible thing to do when you lose your job is to double-down at the blackjack table. This time, Reno was kind to us after an insane day of fishing on Pyramid Lake.

Time was flying by. One day I checked my phone’s calendar, only to realize that it was Day 335. Unbeknownst to me, Laura had cleverly commissioned a gag trophy with a fish jumping out of the water and a plaque that read: “Stephen T Veals: Fished for 365 consecutive days”. It was such a simple, thoughtful gift that it brought tears to my eyes when she presented it prematurely to me with 30 days remaining in the challenge. She was so excited unveil it. After thanking her for such a rad gift, I quickly pointed out that I hadn’t earned the trophy yet and that it didn’t mean that I would be cutting the challenge short and cheating my way across the finish life. To mark the occasion, we even brought it out on my last day on the water, just in time to hoist it alongside my last fish of the year. Into my net sprang a wily, 13” urban brown trout caught on a swung streamer, my favorite way to close out the quest.

Wife of the year, hands down. Laura surprised me with this awesome trophy to mark the occasion and I have it proudly displayed at my office.

Wife of the year, hands down. Laura surprised me with this awesome trophy to mark the occasion and I have it proudly displayed at my office.

So what did I learn after fishing more than most average-Joes get to fish in an entire lifetime? The lesson here remains the same: Fish. Every. Single. Day.

Who cares how dumb you look bringing a fly rod to a Napa Valley wine tasting room? Let your buddies laugh. Let your boss laugh at you. Let the whole world think you’re crazy. You may even be certifiable, but at least you’re catching fish while you undergo a mental re-evaluation of your life’s goals. We’re on this earth a short time and the sand keeps slipping through the hour glass…

Fight to keep it upright as long as you can…and don’t forget to teach someone to fish along the way.

It’s moments like these that keep you fishing. We didn’t even catch any fish this day but it didn’t matter. Angling buddies are what count on tough days.

It’s moments like these that keep you fishing. We didn’t even catch any fish this day but it didn’t matter. Angling buddies are what count on tough days.

Shooting Video in New York City by Stephen Veals

A still from a Brooklyn Bridge time lapse during a 2014 fashion shoot.

A still from a Brooklyn Bridge time lapse during a 2014 fashion shoot.

I'm not a city fan, but NYC definitely leaves you in awe.

I'm not a city fan, but NYC definitely leaves you in awe.

This city is rough. It's crowded. It's loud. You'll never get good audio on the streets doing interviews and everyone always wants a piece of the action. You have to have permits and special permission from EVERYONE. The city. The store owners, the homeless guy in front of the subway station you're shooting at. Literally everyone has a stake in your finished film. The companies I worked for never wanted to get these special permits so it was always run and gun. This included never getting to use a tripod or a stabilizer because that meant "Professional" which equaled shooting permit required. As soon as a tripod leg hit the floor at Grand Central Station, the police were onto me. Same thing throughout Lower Manhattan and in Brooklyn shooting the Brooklyn Bridge. It's frustrating but part of the game. I shot this Soho fashion partnership between OtterBox and Christine Bibbo Herr a few years back and it actually worked out fairly well. Luckily Christine had permission and special connections with a lot of the business we featured in this spot which helped a ton.

On average, I was traveling to NYC two times a year and I felt like I was getting to really know the city better and better each time. Being from Idaho, it's easy to get overwhelmed and frustrated, and each day I'd return to my hotel exhausted yet energized. The city had a strange way of doing that to me.

There were no bed bugs in this classy hotel since the accommodations in Soho are top notch.

There were no bed bugs in this classy hotel since the accommodations in Soho are top notch.

My last trip to New York was to shoot the OtterBox around the world spot known as "Pass it On" where we sent a cell phone around the globe and shot it in different environments with different folks. This was my favorite shoot since we were working with the talented Thai chef known as Chef Bao Bao. Bao Bao was incredibly down-to-earth and very humble. Her story was one of searching out the American dream which was very inspiring. I ran the 2nd unit on this particular shoot and we ended up with a great piece shot by director/dp Adam Bove, and edited and produced by the awesome production company known as "Friends of Mine." Love that name.

Working with Celebrities by Stephen Veals

I've been fortunate enough to work with a few high profile folks throughout my career and it definitely adds on a few nerves before ever hitting the record button. My first celebrity shoot was for a combined Denver Broncos-OtterBox in-game ad titled "Salute to Service" which was run during the Broncos regular season at Mile High Stadium. The spot featured Bronco's legendary running back Terrell Davis who played from 1995-2001 and was a Pro Football Hall of Famer and helped the Broncos to major super bowl victories in 1997 and 1998.

As someone who admittedly doesn't watch a ton of football (as in ever, ever, seriously, just the Super Bowl once a year) I felt really awkward asking Terrell questions between takes but I soon realized what everyone secretly knows which is, "This guy still has to put pants on one leg at a time". Translation: He's a regular dude! I instantly began to relax and fell into the mindset of getting Terrell to shine on camera. He took instruction very well and even shared stories about golfing inside of his buddy's mansion in which he, "Broke a bunch of chandeliers and it got pretty wild." Could I relate to this? No. But it was hilarious hearing what the rich and famous do in their downtime.

Terrell Davis takes a break between shoots to show some love.

Terrell Davis takes a break between shoots to show some love.

Flash foward a few years later and I'm scheduled to work with Super Bowl legend Peyton Manning. PFM I thought to myself. A guy who most dudes would sell their soul to hang out with. And here I was, not a football stat to lean on. Luckily but also strangely, Peyton's agent informed us that since he was slated to make big bucks on the shoot, he didn't like small talk. "Seriously. No damn small talk guys." That was the advice we were given when working on set. I get it. The dude is all business and he doesn't want to waste your time or money. Copy that. However, even when the meter is running, there's still downtime moments of hooking up a microphone to his shirt (awkward since I'm 5'4" and could barely reach his neck line) and moments right after takes to provide feedback on how he's preforming as on-camera talent. Oh well, here's a gem for you guys to laugh at. Notice the height difference:

The real deal even though we both look like cardboard cutouts.

The real deal even though we both look like cardboard cutouts.

The next few high profile shoots involved action sports stars from the X-Games. I was slated to work with X-Games gold medalist Jarryd McNeil, and olympic athlete and X-Games gold medalist Bobby Brown. Talk about down to earth folks. All of the action sports guys, in my humble opinion, were way easier to work with than any mainstream sports athletes. They had a lot more to lose and put a lot more on the line. As in...well...death. They could die every single time they step out onto the track or the slopes. The same can't be said for football players and you can guess who gets paid more.

I was stoked to snap a selfie with Jarryd right after he won his 2nd X-Games Austin gold medal. The man crushed it. We took him out to dinner as a LifeProof-sponsored athlete and it was really neat to meet his parents and girlfriend who get merit badges for sitting through countless early morning training sessions, over 200 plus days on the road traveling to and from competitions, and for always being the most rock solid cheerleaders for Jarryd. I walked away with a new appreciation for action sports athletes, and even more respect for their families.

Jarryd McNeil and I celebrating some Aussie Gold! Yes ESPN named me "Seve Veals" which sounded Scandinavian.

Jarryd McNeil and I celebrating some Aussie Gold! Yes ESPN named me "Seve Veals" which sounded Scandinavian.

Bobby Brown visiting Fort Collins before Winter X Games.

Bobby Brown visiting Fort Collins before Winter X Games.

The last few times involving celebrities in my career meant meeting Morgan Spurlock at the NAB Vegas Trade show while listening to a talk he gave about his production company: Warrior Poets. He is one of the coolest people I have ever met and he really works his ass off to ensure that each and every one of his films or TV shows has meaning and resonates with folks. Basically, not producing garbage, which 95% of content makers could take a queue from. Morgan took time to meet his fans and really engage with them on what makes content compelling and inspiring. Below is a rookie mistake for Selfies 101. The ole cross-eyed staredown.

I have a turkey neck in this photo but Morgan is looking sharp.

I have a turkey neck in this photo but Morgan is looking sharp.

Continuing with inspirational celebrities, I was incredibly humbled to work with Erik Weihenmayer, a man who lost his eye sight from a very young age but was determined to continue living life to the fullest. He started rock climbing and kayaking and was the first blind person to summit Mount Everest along with all the remaining 7 summits of the world. Not only that, Erik kayaked the entire length of the Grand Canyon! I have a film about it on my site which you should definitely check out because this man is incredibly motivating. In his spare time, Erik takes veterans suffering from PTSD on mountain expeditions to counsel them on living as handicapped individuals. Very cool.

Erik and I at his office in Golden, Colorado.

Erik and I at his office in Golden, Colorado.

A few years later, I was fortunate enough to work in Mexico City with Mexican TV hostess Aly Villegas. She played a starring role in our Symmetry Series portion of OtterBox's "Pass it On" campaign. We followed Aly through a day in the life of hanging with friends, sight-seeing in CDMX, as well as a fun shoot that culminated on the helipad of the Hyatt Mexico City. You seriously can't make this stuff up. Aly was very kind and fluent in both English and Spanish which made for a very fun shoot. Here's a photo that Aly took while instructing me on how to take a proper selfie. I swear I'll learn one of these days.

Aly Villegas and I after the morning shoot in Mexico City. My Mexican mustache game could use some upgrades.

Aly Villegas and I after the morning shoot in Mexico City. My Mexican mustache game could use some upgrades.

Our crew wrap photo on the helipad of the Hyatt Regency Mexico City!

Our crew wrap photo on the helipad of the Hyatt Regency Mexico City!

Pilgrimage to Pyramid Lake, Nevada by Stephen Veals

This has been on my bucket list for a long time now and I finally was able to put a weekend together with a buddy of mine to make it happen. Pyramid Lake is an alkaline lake set in a large basin east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range northeast of Reno, Nevada. The native Lahontan Cutthroats grow to monumental sizes and the current record is north of 40 lbs out of Pyramid with catches regularly exceeding 20 lbs.  We weren't able to get into the big boys, but we definitely enjoyed nighttime streamer fishing along with an incredibly tough day of fishing in driving snow and wind. Here are some highlight photos from the excursion: 

The saying the early bird gets the worm really runs true in fishing sometimes. We were out long before the sun cam up, the waters calm and the fish biting.
The waters were calm as the sun rose into the sky. We fished all day searching for that perfect catch, but each time we were eluded by the tricky cutthroat at Pyramid Lake.
After hours of waiting thinking that we would be going home empty, there was a tug at the end of my pole and as I reeled it in to my delight I had caught my first cutthroat of the trip at Pyramid Lake, Nevada!
Our luck just kept getting better as the next day we caught several more cutthroat at Pyramid Lake. Each fish more beautiful and even bigger than our last haul! This boys trip was a real success!
Our final catch of the trip was a beauty! Our fly fishing pilgrimage to Pyramid Lake, Nevada had be not only fun but fruitful. 

Experimenting with light and darkness by Stephen Veals

On a recent trip to Twin Harbors, Minnesota, I was fascinated by the large-scale, industrial operations that take place, almost unnoticed to locals every single day in the Great Lakes area. I wanted to try and capture these relics of modern industry and the size and scope of the equipment involved. Here are two photos from the iron ore loading facility based in Twin Harbors. I enjoy shooting at night due to the fact that it brings out a sense of ominous character to things that would otherwise seem pretty mundane during the daytime hours.

Twin Harbors Iron Ore Processing Facility.

Twin Harbors Iron Ore Processing Facility.

The lighthouse watching over the harbor activities.

The lighthouse watching over the harbor activities.

Busch Beer's Latest Advertisement by Stephen Veals

Well let's face it. PBR has totally cornered the hipster beer market. Maybe it's the blue ribbon, maybe it's the smooth, unfiltered taste, but either way, they're making millions off college students across the U.S. So what can other urine-tasting beer competitors do about this? Two words: smear campaign. If it works every 4 years during the presidential election, it’s bound to work now. Luckily for Busch, I've already created a brand new campaign at no charge, and it is ready to cut into PBR's profits at a moment's notice. This spot was filmed with the Sony FS 700 at 480 fps and post-production work was done in Final Cut Pro 7 with color grading completed in Adobe Speed Grade. Enjoy!

Elena LaGoo's MS Project & Fundraiser by Stephen Veals

This past month I’ve had the honor and the privilege to work on one of the most meaningful projects of my entire video career. My coworker Elena LaGoo approached me about creating a video to help tell the story of how she was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis or MS and she wanted it to also serve as a fundraising tool on her Community Funded webpage. The idea was to raise approximately $20,000 for her to travel to Panama City, Panama in order to receive a game changing, stem cell treatment. The research trials have not only helped MS patients, but also some of the participants have even noticed that they can walk without pain and their overall condition and quality of life has drastically improved thanks to the experimental treatment. Since it’s not available in the U.S. due to politics and bureaucratic red tape from insurance companies, Elena was forced to take out a loan with her husband Charlie with the hope of visiting this ground breaking research facility all on their own. So check out her story, and if you’re able to donate, please send a check to:

525 Fox Glove Ct. Fort Collins, CO 80524

100% of these donations go right to Elena LaGoo and as of today, she is at ¾ of her $20,000 goal! Thanks everybody.